PRESS RELEASE: Farmington police are taking a proactive approach to combating property crime

Farmington, NM ­- The Farmington Police Department is working to combat property crime with a newly implemented program – impact teams. The teams are led by a corporal and comprised of one member of each of the following divisions: patrol, detectives, District Coordinator Unit, and traffic. Their monthly operations are carried out using a data-driven approach to decrease crime in problem areas. Target crimes include residential burglary, auto burglary and shoplifting. The team chooses a specific crime and location according to data provided by FPD’s crime analyst. “Property crimes are among some of the most difficult to investigate and incredibly frustrating for our citizens,” said Capt. Dowdy. “By taking a proactive, data-driven approach to these types of crimes, we hope to greatly reduce the number of occurrences.”

The impact team’s initial operation took place in September 2017; they’ve since conducted five successful operations. December’s operation targeted shoplifting at select major retail stores and resulted in 23 arrests; the highest number thus far. Of those arrests, 19 were from warrants, 11 from shoplifting charges, four trespassing charges, seven drug-related charges and one open container charge. The team’s most recent operation took place in January and focused on burglaries in known problem areas; six arrests and three citations were issued. Of those arrests, two were of individuals who had warrants for burglary.

The program’s overall success will be measured by the number of arrests made in addition to whether or not target crimes in specific areas decrease. “The safety and well-being of the community are of the utmost importance to FPD,” said Capt. Dowdy. “We will continue to monitor crime trends, analyze the effectiveness of this new program and adjust our approach to addressing these crimes as appropriate.”

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PRESS RELEASE: COLD CASE, Missing Person

Seeking information on the disappearance of 83-year-old Lynn Goldin

Farmington, NM – Detectives with the Farmington Police Department are reaching out to the community for assistance in locating missing person, Lynn R. Goldin. In August of 2016, Lynn, 83, left his home in Vancouver, Wash. bound for Hogback, N.M. in search of treasure. He hasn’t been seen since. At the time of his disappearance, Lynn was described as 5 feet 10 inches tall, weighing 220 lbs. He had a white beard, short grey/white hair and no tattoos or scars. Lynn would have been wearing a hat of some type, loose fitting pants and always wore a Black Hills Gold crucifix.  He was driving his grey 2006 Hummer H2 with a personalized Washington license plate: GOLDIN2.
Aaron Goldin, Lynn’s son, explained that his father loved to travel to different states and prospect for treasure. Aaron said it wasn’t his father’s first trip to the area as he and Lynn previously traveled to Hogback. They explored the mesas and canyons north of PNM Power Plant in search of unclaimed treasures. Aaron spoke with his dad on August 29 when his dad told him he was headed to New Mexico, but when his father hadn’t checked in with him by September 10 and he was unable to reach him by phone, he contacted the Farmington Police Department for assistance.

It was confirmed that Lynn arrived in Farmington. He made a purchase at Walmart on West Main Street on September 1 and a short time later purchased fuel at the Circle W on U.S. Highway 64 in Waterflow. Lynn hasn’t been seen or heard from since. His vehicle hasn’t been found and there’s been no activity on his credit card.

On September 22, 2016, Aaron and Brian Goldin, Lynn’s grandson, traveled to New Mexico to conduct a search. They rented an airplane and coordinated assistance with the New Mexico Badlands Search and Rescue Team Inc. but were unsuccessful in locating any signs of him. Extensive follow up has been conducted in efforts to locate Lynn and his vehicle with no success.

Farmington detectives are asking anyone with information about Lynn R. Goldin and/or his vehicle to call Detective Heather Chavez at 566-2370 or non-emergency dispatch at 334-6622. Anonymous tips may be submitted to San Juan County Crime Stoppers at 334-TIPS.

*Attached is a photo of Lynn Goldin and a stock photo of the type of vehicle he was driving.

Traffic Tuesday

Why do we disclose the location of our focused traffic enforcements?

Traffic Tuesday 1

Our Traffic Division monitors activity throughout Farmington and focuses their efforts on high problem areas where speeding and crashes are common occurrences. We’ve been sharing our focused enforcements on Facebook and are frequently asked why we disclose the locations. Our goal isn’t to get out there and write as many tickets as possible, but rather to prevent traffic violations and reduce the number of crashes by being highly visible to the public. This helps to serve as a deterrent, reminding people to slow down and abide by traffic laws. In addition, it increases transparency and public participation. We want you to know about the problems we face and how we are working to solve those problems. We also need your help to make Farmington the best place to live, work, and play.

Starting today through the end of August, our Traffic Division will be focusing their efforts on East and West Main near both Walmarts. These are areas where crashes commonly occur. Please help us keep our roadways safe by observing the rules of the road and Reporting Aggressive and Drunk Driving by calling 911. #RADD #slowdown#waittotext #traffictuesday

 

Traffic Tip Tuesday: Motorcycle vs vehicle crash test

May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month. This month’s Traffic Tip Tuesday topics are dedicated to safe motorcycle riding.

To wrap up our series on motorcycle safety, I want to illustrate why I have been discussing the topics we’ve covered. I want all motorists to be as safe as they can be; motorcycle and bicycle riders are at the highest risk of being injured in a collision. I was very fortunate to attend the 2016 ARC-CSI Crash Conference in Las Vegas, NV.  During the conference, I observed crash testing and was provided data, photos and videos of the crashes performed. Several of the tests involved motorcycles.  As an avid motorcyclist and safety advocate, I was extremely interested in observing these tests.

The test we will discuss and watch video from, is a motorcycle vs passenger car. The impact is on the rear door of the passenger side of the car with the front end of the motorcycle. This test simulates an intersection crash. As there are no stop signs or traffic signals on the test track, we have to use some imagination. One of the vehicles fails to yield to the other and a crash occurs. Regardless of who commits the yield violation, we will see it would end poorly for the motorcyclist. This is a fairly low speed test, about 20 to 30 mph on the motorcycle. The car is stationary when struck. I wish there would have been a biomechanical dummy on the motorcycle, but we can imagine what would happen to the rider in this collision.

Videos provided courtesy of Collision Publishing and ARC (Accident Reconstruction Network).

Although no safety equipment can guarantee the rider’s safety, it greatly increases the survivability of the rider.  A few years ago I was involved in a collision very similar to this one. A vehicle failed to stop at a red light and I hit the driver’s side passenger door. I was thrown from my motorcycle and landed on the asphalt, striking the back of my head on the pavement. Had I not been wearing my helmet, I would have sustained a serious brain injury, if not killed. I was fortunate and walked away from the crash. The safety gear saved me from serious injury. In short, it worked.

In closing, I would encourage you, as riders and passengers, to wear safety equipment and learn advanced riding techniques.  Make the investment in yourself and your family.

Above all, ride safe and have fun!

Snowbarger, MartinMartin Snowbarger has been a law enforcement officer for 18 years. He’s worked for the Farmington Police Department for 15 years and in Raton, NM for three years. Officer Snowbarger has been with FPD’s Traffic Division since 2003 and has been a Certified Child Passenger Safety Technician and Traffic Collision Reconstructionist for 11 years.

PRESS RELEASE: DWI checkpoints to be conducted in June

Farmington, NM – The Farmington Police Department, in partnership with other area law enforcement agencies, will be conducting DWI checkpoints during the month of June. These checkpoints are part of a continuing effort to reduce the number of injuries and deaths related to drunk driving. The DWI checkpoints are in addition to FPD’s ongoing R.A.D.D. campaign, which encourages citizens to call 911 to report aggressive and drunk drivers. There were a total of 794 DWI arrests made by Farmington police in 2015, 242 of those arrests were from citizen calls. The Farmington Police Department would like to thank the public for taking an active role in helping to keep our roadways safe. We encourage everyone to remember and participate in R.A.D.D. – report aggressive and drunk drivers.

Traffic Tip Tuesday: Motorcycle safety equipment

May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month. This month’s Traffic Tip Tuesday topics are dedicated to safe motorcycle riding. Today’s topic is safety equipment.

 

Traffic Tip Tuesday: Helmet safety

May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month. This month’s Traffic Tip Tuesday topics will be dedicated to safe motorcycle riding. Today’s topic is helmet safety.