Traffic Tuesday

Why do we disclose the location of our focused traffic enforcements?

Traffic Tuesday 1

Our Traffic Division monitors activity throughout Farmington and focuses their efforts on high problem areas where speeding and crashes are common occurrences. We’ve been sharing our focused enforcements on Facebook and are frequently asked why we disclose the locations. Our goal isn’t to get out there and write as many tickets as possible, but rather to prevent traffic violations and reduce the number of crashes by being highly visible to the public. This helps to serve as a deterrent, reminding people to slow down and abide by traffic laws. In addition, it increases transparency and public participation. We want you to know about the problems we face and how we are working to solve those problems. We also need your help to make Farmington the best place to live, work, and play.

Starting today through the end of August, our Traffic Division will be focusing their efforts on East and West Main near both Walmarts. These are areas where crashes commonly occur. Please help us keep our roadways safe by observing the rules of the road and Reporting Aggressive and Drunk Driving by calling 911. #RADD #slowdown#waittotext #traffictuesday

 

Traffic Tip Tuesday: Motorcycle vs vehicle crash test

May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month. This month’s Traffic Tip Tuesday topics are dedicated to safe motorcycle riding.

To wrap up our series on motorcycle safety, I want to illustrate why I have been discussing the topics we’ve covered. I want all motorists to be as safe as they can be; motorcycle and bicycle riders are at the highest risk of being injured in a collision. I was very fortunate to attend the 2016 ARC-CSI Crash Conference in Las Vegas, NV.  During the conference, I observed crash testing and was provided data, photos and videos of the crashes performed. Several of the tests involved motorcycles.  As an avid motorcyclist and safety advocate, I was extremely interested in observing these tests.

The test we will discuss and watch video from, is a motorcycle vs passenger car. The impact is on the rear door of the passenger side of the car with the front end of the motorcycle. This test simulates an intersection crash. As there are no stop signs or traffic signals on the test track, we have to use some imagination. One of the vehicles fails to yield to the other and a crash occurs. Regardless of who commits the yield violation, we will see it would end poorly for the motorcyclist. This is a fairly low speed test, about 20 to 30 mph on the motorcycle. The car is stationary when struck. I wish there would have been a biomechanical dummy on the motorcycle, but we can imagine what would happen to the rider in this collision.

Videos provided courtesy of Collision Publishing and ARC (Accident Reconstruction Network).

Although no safety equipment can guarantee the rider’s safety, it greatly increases the survivability of the rider.  A few years ago I was involved in a collision very similar to this one. A vehicle failed to stop at a red light and I hit the driver’s side passenger door. I was thrown from my motorcycle and landed on the asphalt, striking the back of my head on the pavement. Had I not been wearing my helmet, I would have sustained a serious brain injury, if not killed. I was fortunate and walked away from the crash. The safety gear saved me from serious injury. In short, it worked.

In closing, I would encourage you, as riders and passengers, to wear safety equipment and learn advanced riding techniques.  Make the investment in yourself and your family.

Above all, ride safe and have fun!

Snowbarger, MartinMartin Snowbarger has been a law enforcement officer for 18 years. He’s worked for the Farmington Police Department for 15 years and in Raton, NM for three years. Officer Snowbarger has been with FPD’s Traffic Division since 2003 and has been a Certified Child Passenger Safety Technician and Traffic Collision Reconstructionist for 11 years.

PRESS RELEASE: DWI checkpoints to be conducted in June

Farmington, NM – The Farmington Police Department, in partnership with other area law enforcement agencies, will be conducting DWI checkpoints during the month of June. These checkpoints are part of a continuing effort to reduce the number of injuries and deaths related to drunk driving. The DWI checkpoints are in addition to FPD’s ongoing R.A.D.D. campaign, which encourages citizens to call 911 to report aggressive and drunk drivers. There were a total of 794 DWI arrests made by Farmington police in 2015, 242 of those arrests were from citizen calls. The Farmington Police Department would like to thank the public for taking an active role in helping to keep our roadways safe. We encourage everyone to remember and participate in R.A.D.D. – report aggressive and drunk drivers.

Traffic Tip Tuesday: Motorcycle safety equipment

May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month. This month’s Traffic Tip Tuesday topics are dedicated to safe motorcycle riding. Today’s topic is safety equipment.

 

Traffic Tip Tuesday: Helmet safety

May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month. This month’s Traffic Tip Tuesday topics will be dedicated to safe motorcycle riding. Today’s topic is helmet safety.

Traffic Tip Tuesday: Safe Braking

May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month. This month’s Traffic Tip Tuesday topics will be dedicated to safe motorcycle riding. Our first post for May is a video on safe braking.

An unexpected Christmas

Greetings,

I want to pass on a brief story that just took place. Wednesday, officers responded to a local hotel to evict an individual who could no longer pay for her room. It turned out to be a mother and her four children. Officer Keith Herrera was the responding officer and instead of simply evicting her, he worked hard to help the woman find a place she could stay. He contacted several charities, however, none could accommodate her at this time. When the officer ran out of options, he contacted his supervisor and eventually his shift commander, Lt. Dale Bode. Lt. Bode used his own money to pay for four additional nights for the family to stay at the hotel. Officer Herrera gave the mother money for food. When word hit the station, employees donated additional money so the family could buy Christmas presents and would have gas money to get to Phoenix after the holiday. In total, individual FPD employees donated over $1,200 to the family. Additionally, Officer Herrera and Corporal Al Boognl picked up the family and took them to Target so they could do their Christmas shopping. Target was extremely supportive and donated to the family as well so that they would have a surprising and unexpected Christmas.

It can be easy to forget how many good people put on the blue uniform. Police officers see so much of the hopelessness of things around us, from alcohol and drug abuse to violence. We in Farmington are fortunate to have so many good men and women who are determined to make a difference in the world. As their chief, I am very proud of them. To the community, I ask you to keep this family in your thoughts and prayers. I also ask you to remember all the men and women devoted to keeping us safe, even during the holidays.

Merry Christmas!

Chief Hebbe